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to be in charge the coverage was there. i am not sure a lot of that registered in washington intelligence community where we had a different sense of the soviet leadership we were acquiring as we went through the dialogue it became difficult to look what we were getting from the intelligence side and what we received across the table but in geneva as president reagan met gorbachev the first time the two of them met in front of a fireplace conversation later walking along the lake and began to see the emergence where people accept and believe in president reagan's view of the role of nuclear weapons, very real distasteful. the key documents that emerged from geneva besides agreements later, the key document, the joint statement at the beginning, two leaders agree nuclear war can never be won and must never be fought. there were negotiations going on at the time, negotiations going on in geneva but they began to take their lead from the summit discussions. we were not able easily to get to the washington summit. kept running into bilateral issues in which one of our correspondents was picke
, in the area from washington d.c. to new york and boston. and let me say i think it is absolutely critical that we develop that corridor. not only the regional interest but the national interest. we have the highest concentration of population, the most sophisticated delivery system and interconnection, we have light rail, subway, metro, connectors all up and down the corridor so that high-speed rail is not something that will run by itself as opposed to last week where we heard about the major red ministrations effort to produce high speed, they're doing it between bakersfield and fresno, california where there are very few people, their contention is long-term connected in population centers in san francisco and los angeles, but it will be a long time before that is accomplished. right now we do have the connectivity we need to, the population, and we also have the only corridor, 430 some mile corridor almost entirely unknown by amtrak, the american people and the taxpayers. that is opposed to the rest of amtrak service, 20,000 miles of service, long-distance, inner-city service, on whic
dedication to their success. he met with alaska native people during their visit to washington as often, and i would say even more often, than the alaska members in the house or senate. they made a point to stop by his office on a regular occasion, to talk to him about what happened in the past, what is going on today and what to look for in the future. earlier this year senator inouye was in alaska at my invitation come his last trip to alaska. he told of a memorable story about his support of the trans-alaska oil pipeline which was controversial when he supported it and its construction. he had a unique style on how to tell stories and you had to pay attention and listen. his words were very to the point. senator inouye told a story told by opponents of the pipeline that it would destroy the caribou which lived in alaska's north slope. this is what he was told over and over again. on his last trip he was in front of a group of people and i was anxious as i started to talk. he said at the story to tell you when he talked about this time of controversy about the alaska north slope and t
in the rotunda. friday at 10:30 p.m. eastern, the public memorial will be held at the washington national cathedral. >> senator kay bailey hutchison, republican of texas, is retiring from the senate after serving four terms. she will be replaced by republican ted cruz, a former texas solicitor general. she delivers her farewell remarks on the senate floor. this is 25 minutes. week there would have been so much joy in the halls of the capitol bringing with the laughter and the anticipation of our seasons happiest time. but in just one weekend, a sadness have said in with the news of the massacre of innocent children in newtown, connecticut, followed by the loss of our wonderful colleague, senator daniel inouye. so i will leave this extraordinary institution and experience with a heavy heart for those who have been lost just in the last few days. i do want to thank you for asking me to represent them in washington. i want to thank the many people who have served on my staff for almost 20 years. i have to say i am touched that both senses, on both sides of this room are filled with my staff
carolina. his 2009 "abigail adams" won the bancroft prize. holten is a finalist for the george washington book prize and national book award. his first book, "forced founders: indians, debtors, slaves and the making of the american revolution in virginia," won the organization of american historians 'mel kurdy award. i'm honor today introduce -- honored to introduce woody holten. [applause] >> first, i want to celebrate the wisdom ask and the congeniality of the fellow judges who gave up a half year of tear own writing to -- of their own writing to help find the fife amazing books that we present to you tonight. they are brad gooch, linda gordon, susan orlene and judith -- [inaudible] [applause] the other judges and i also want to give special thanks to sherry young who was our tireless and perfectionist liaison at the national book foundation. thank you, sherry. [applause] the finalists for the 2012 national book award for nonfiction are anne applebaum, "iron curtain: the crushing of eastern europe, 1845-1856" published by doubleday. and katherine boo, behind the beautiful forevers. [app
-- archives here in washington. this is about 20 minutes. >> good evening. i'm the archivist of the united states and is a pleasure to welcome you to the national archives in theater this evening. a special welcome to our friends at c-span and the other media outlets who are with us tonight. we have a lot of special guests in the audience today but i want to single out a special welcome to senator mike reed who is a good friend of the national archives, senator reed from utah. [applause] who himself clerked for a future supreme court justice, judge alito when he was at the u.s. court of appeals on the third circuit. welcome. on monday the constitution of the united states turned 225. tonight's program is one of several that the national archives is presenting this month in celebration of the founding document, signed in philadelphia on september 17, 1787. tonight we are honored to welcome two distinguished guests to explore the past, present and future of united states constitution. our partners for tonight's program in honor of those of the constitution are the federalist society and the
people own, have an interest in 600 miles of track between washington d.c. our nation's capital, philadelphia, new york city, boston, the most congested corridor in the united states of america, that is the only 600 miles that we really own. we another small stretches around the commuter -- all the rest of amtrak service, over 20,000 miles of private freight rail. i see the main rail people in the audience and they have concerns too about using theirs and not having dedicated them and we need to address that issue as we move forward. final point is northeast quarter is where we should be putting the focus. give the administration credit for at least taking the money that has been turned back dedicating so that to the northeast quarter but we are doing it in a piecemeal, half baked fashion. the northeast corridor, every state, every major area can benefit by bringing high-speed rail to the northeast corridor. 70% of our air traffic delays emanate from the northeast corridor even when we have next-generation air traffic control, move planes faster and closer together with doubling
, washington, he got a job selling furniture in honolulu. he was always looking over the next thing. moving west. he moved from kansas, california, spent time and seattle, seattle to hawaii. so she came along as a family. she was only 17 when she graduated from high school, and excellent public school in suburban seattle. her name is stanley and. his name was stanley. barack obama had been there since 1969. also an undergraduate even though he was much older. and they both happen to sign up for a beginning russian class. this was during right after sputnik and the schools all of the country are starting to teach russian. it was the most important thing public schools could do, prepare the u.s. for the cold war. so they both ended up in a russian class and that's what the met. >> host: how long do they know each other before they got married? >> guest: they knew each other for five months. they met in september. they got married in february. she got pregnant before that. so it was, everything about it was, you know, it was not a normal courtship, normal, let me put it that way than what what
in washington, d.c. however, the proximity of the south caucasus to iran as well as strong relationship with armenia, azerbaijan and georgia. have with both of the united states and israel, it increases the appeal of the iranians for targeting those countries. i applaud those governments in the region for the vigilance against the iranian threat. however, i'm particularly concerned about the security at the u.s. embassy as the agent location of the facility leave our people there particularly vulnerable. i often find myself comparing the geopolitics of the south caucasus to accordion not. a tangle of current events of these countries in the region isolated from their neighbors. unfortunately, such isolation can blame to the hands of hours laying on the periphery of the region. press reports and conversations i had while i was in the region indicate that iran is taking or at least has the potential to take advantage of armenians regional isolation and thus the country's economic dependence on their common border to use armenian banks and enterprises to skirt international sanctions. the
] >> welcome again to the foundation for defense of democracy's annual washington forum. my name is kenneth schwartz. i have the pleasure of introducing distinguished public official robert kc, senior senator from the state of pennsylvania. you served since 2007 as chairman of near east and south asia subcommittee, senate foreign relations committee only in the first term. one can scarcely imagine a more challenging time, the past two years in the middle east have seen wars in international borders, collapse of regimes in decades and the rise of political movements that may yet turn hostile in the united states and its allies. new developments, he has led the way on many issues of great concern to ftd. he is founder and co-chair of the bipartisan senate caucus on weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, in that capacity worked across the partisan divide to highlight serious threats of -- weapons of mass deliberation. he has done as much to run our greatest threat in the middle east and often lead the way on pressure advancing nuclear activities and efforts to destabilize the middle east. in
inouye this morning at washington national cathedral. senate majority leader harry reid and eric shinseki will be among those eulogizing the hawaii senator who died on monday at the age of 88. you can watch the proceedings live at 10:30 eastern here on c-span2. >> i don't want to spoil the book for you, so let me just say that the year began with the american ree public in grave danger. the union armies were struggling to grow virtually overnight from a few thousand men scattered across the continent to more than half a million. the inexperienced officers thrust into command of these raw volunteers were stymied by the sheer size of the breakaway confederate states of america. which covered a space larger than the entire european territory conquered by napoleon. lincoln's closest adviser was secretary of state william henry seward. seward said that even smart or people failed to see the difficulty of the union's task. they didn't apprehend the vast extent of the rebellion, as he put it. military operations, to be successful, must be on a scale hitherto practically unknown in the art of war
never get the "washington post" to print this point, but robert byrd when he was majority leader exercise the nuclear option four times. it goes back to the beginning of the senate whereby you set binding precedent in the senate by simple majority rules. furthermore, it was being used admittedly extraordinary, one that i think out to be used in very rare occasion, only for extenuating circumstances was done not to up in the tradition but to restore it. prior to 2003 derrick never been a judge, avril edition nominee denied confirmation deeply filibuster. never, never, never never. beginning with -- i think ultimately five judges who have the majority support, push judges who were all denied confirmation deeply filibuster though they had majority support. prior to that it'd never happen. so we are trying to restore the what it always been. you can argue that ought to be a majority. that had not been the standard pride 2003. on your question of time, you're right. biggest vulnerability is time. everything takes so long. i remember when it came to the house and i came over to the sen
billion or 1416 or something like that. we are talking a lot of money even in washington. >> that is the issue here. i know we're having a debate about how much should be available, there are others being put forward, i know we have some disagreements with the subcommittee about the statutes, what it says or doesn't say and we will get to that a little later. i will recognize the gentlewoman from california, miss eshoo for five minute. thank you. i hope we will have another round because there are a lot of questions that need to be asked. i am troubled by the claims of the public safety spectrum act is all about revenue raising. the last time i checked this is the energy and commerce committee, not the budget committee. having said that, i think we did a good job to bring about a balance, to bring about the dollars that would fund the public safety network, that we would produce dollars for deficit reduction, but again, this is the energy and commerce committee, in section 309 of the communications act explicitly prohibits the fcc from basing its auction rules predominate
in washington because we have got nobody in the middle. as the book points out in a national study of record there is no republican with a morbid liberal voting record than democrats so now we have literally the zero overlap between the two parties and maybe moderate isn't the word we should be using. i think you make a good point. lugar has a conservative voting record and a conservative history of half a century in the government and as a major cities a conservative but the reason that the reporters have called him moderate is not because of his voting record but it's because of his manner and in this climate, she has a moderate manner and that he is willing to talk to democrats. he is willing to work with sam and engage with president obama on issues and there are some liberal democrats so maybe that is the language that we should be more careful to use. >> can i just follow a format? i think susan is right. it's about more than ideology it would be a mistake to say this is nothing but an ideological polarization of the parties. it also has to do with the sort of process of politics and a
was driving from washington to his home in new hampshire. he stopped at a restaurant to get something to eat. and the couple came up to him and the guy said, you are on the supreme court, right? and he said, you are stephen breyer, and he didn't want to be embarrassed in front of his wife, so we said yes, i am stephen breyer, i am stephen breyer, and then they chatted for a little while and the guy said, what is the best thing about being on the supreme court? and he thought for a minute and he said, i would have to save take the privilege of serving with david souter. [laughter] how could you not love a guy like that. so i'm taking nominations for my favorite justice. okay, let's talk about the current supreme court by the numbers. well, there are six men and three women. first time in history there are three women in court. [applause] there are six catholics and three jews. no applause for the catholics and jews here? [applause] no partisans for the first time in history. there are representatives of four new york city boroughs on this record. tragically, staten island is underrepresented
a washington internship program. i look forward to announcing additional endeavors of service in the coming weeks. my service in the senate would not have been possible without the encouragement and the constant support of my loving wife, shar, our four sons, mark, bob, john and david, and the entire lugar family, most of which is with us here in the galleries today. their strength and sacrifices have been indispensable to my public service. i'm also very much indebted to a great number of talented and loyal friends who have served with me in the senate, including, by my count, more than 300 senators, hundreds of personal and committee staff members, and more than a thousand student interns. in my experience, it is difficult to conceive of a better platform from which to devote one's self to public service and the search for solutions to national and international problems. at its best, the senate is one of the founders' most important creations. a great deal has been written recently about political discord in the united states, with some commentators judging that partisanship is at an all
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16

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